New York Giants Tickets : Best Professional Football Team Of All Time

By | April 16, 2018

The New York Giants are a professional football team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey, representing the New York metropolitan area. The team plays their games at New Meadowlands Stadium. In a unique arrangement, the team shares the stadium with the New York Jets.

The Giants are currently members of the Eastern Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). They were one of five teams that joined the NFL in 1925, but the only one admitted that year which still exists.
The Giants rank third among all NFL franchises with seven NFL titles: four in the pre Super Bowl era (1927, 1934, 1938, 1956) and three since the advent of the Super Bowl (Super Bowls XXI (1986), XXV (1990), and XLII (2007)). Their championship tally is surpassed only by the Green Bay Packers (12) and Chicago Bears (9). During their history, the Giants have featured 15 Hall of Fame players, including NFL Most Valuable Player (MVP) award winners Mel Hein, Frank Gifford, Charlie Conerly, Y. A. Tittle, and Lawrence Taylor.

To distinguish it from the professional baseball team of the same name, the football team was incorporated as the “New York National League Football Company, Inc.” in 1929 and changed to “New York Football Giants, Inc.” in 1937. Although the baseball team moved to San Francisco after the 1957 season, the football team continues to use “New York Football Giants, Inc.” as its legal corporate name and is often referred to by fans and sportscasters as the “New York Football Giants”.

The team has also gained several nicknames, including “Big Blue”, the “G-Men”, and the “Jints”, an intentionally mangled abbreviation seen frequently in the New York Post and New York Daily News, originating from the baseball team when they were based in New York. Additionally the team as a whole is occasionally referred to as the “Big Blue Wrecking Crew”, even though this moniker primarily and originally refers to the Giants defensive unit during the 80’s and early 90’s.
The Giants have had a long and, at times, turbulent financial history. The Giants were founded by Tim Mara with an investment of US$ 500 in 1925 and became one of the first teams in the then five-year-old NFL. To differentiate themselves from the baseball team of the same name, they took the name “New York Football Giants”, which they still use as their legal corporate name.

Although the Giants were successful on the field in their initial seasons, their financial status was a different story. Overshadowed by baseball, boxing, and college football, professional football was not a popular sport in 1925. The Giants were in dire financial straits until the 11th game of the season when Red Grange and the Chicago Bears came to town, attracting over 73,000 fans.This gave the Giants a much needed influx of revenue, and perhaps altered the history of the franchise. The following year, Grange and his agent formed a rival league and stationed a competing team, led by Grange, in New York. Though the Giants lost $ 50,000 that season, the rival league folded and was subsumed into the NFL.

Following the 1930 season, Mara transferred ownership of the team over to his two sons to insulate the team from creditors, and by 1946, he had given over complete control of the team to them. Jack, the older son, controlled the business aspects, while Wellington controlled the on-field operations. After their initial struggles the Giants financial status stabilized, and they led the league in attendance several times in the 1930s and 1940s.

By the early 1960s, the Giants had firmly established themselves as one of the league’s biggest attractions. However, rather than continuing to receive their higher share of the league television revenue, the Mara sons pushed for equal sharing of revenue for the benefit of the entire league. Revenue sharing is still practiced in the NFL today, and is credited with strengthening the league.After their struggles in the latter half of the 1960s and the entire 1970s, the Giants hired an outsider, George Young, to run the football operations for the first time in franchise history. The Giants’ on-field product and business aspects improved rapidly following the move.

In 1991, Tim Mara, struggling with cancer at the time, sold his half of the team to Bob Tisch for a reported $ 80 million. This marked the first time in franchise history the team had not been solely owned by the Mara family. In 2005, Wellington Mara, who had been with the team since its inception in 1925 when he worked as a ball boy, died at the age of 89. His death was followed two weeks later by the death of Tisch.

In 2010, the New Meadowlands Stadium opened, replacing Giants Stadium. The new stadium is a 50/50 partnership between the Giants and Jets, and while the stadium is owned by the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority on paper, the two teams jointly built the stadium using private funds, and administer it jointly through New Meadowlands Stadium Corporation. The Giants had previously planned a $ 300 million dollar renovation to the Meadowlands, before deciding in favor of the new stadium which was originally estimated to cost approximately $ 600 million, before rising to an estimated cost of one billion dollars.

One advantage gained by owning the stadium is that the teams saved considerable money in tax payments. The teams leased the land from the state at a cost of $ 6.3 million per year. The state paid for all utilities, including the $ 30 million needed to install them.

Cynthia Hoffman is the author of Ticketwood.com . Ticketwood is a leader tickets market search engine that enable Ticket shoppers to easily find, compare and buy New York Giants Tickets sports tickets, theatre tickets NFL Tickets plus other events tickets.


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